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Opening emails in SharePoint

February 22, 2014 Leave a comment

As part of a recent project we used SharePoint to store emails, both via incoming emails and one of the 3rd party drag and drop tools.

test-emil

Most users were happy with the solution once we had updated the MIME types to allow emails to be opened rather then downloaded, but some still mentioned they would rather that email opened directly from SharePoint rather than seeing the yellow download bar that Internet Explorer puts up.

download

A bit of digging around on the internet came up with the solution from this Microsoft KB article

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2678934

To enable emails to be opened directly from SharePoint the trick is to disable the Internet Explorer download bar for email file types, to do this add the following registry key to your local machine.

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\AttachmentExecute\{0002DF01-0000-0000-C000-000000000046}

then run the assoc command below to get your .msg file extension type (mine is for Office 2013)

assoc

Now add that file type as a zero length binary value to the key created above.

registry

Emails will open directly from SharePoint.

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PowerBI price model revealed

January 16, 2014 Leave a comment

The pricing of the Business Intelligence on the Cloud (Office365) #PowerBI that we demonstrated a few months ago has now been revealed : http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/powerBI/pricing.aspx.

Only US pricing for now.

With 3 licence models to choose  and a price per user, it is fair to say that if you have 1 or 2 “main BI developers” you just need 1-2 licences and all users will be able to see your beautiful BI.

PowerBI Pricing

But be wary looking at the prices as explained here by ZDNet Mary JoFoley:

Andrew Brust, founder of Blue Badge Insights (and “Big on Data” blogger on ZDNet), was a bit less bullish on the Power BI pricing.

“The ‘full boat’ package of Power BI + Office ProPlus is $624/user/year, which is almost exactly 25% more than Tableau Online, at $500/year. Even the Standalone package is $480/user/year which is only a little less than Tableau,” Brust said.

On a side note, there are some really cool PowerBI examples taking part of the PowerBI Contest being submitted so keep an eye on the line-up (interestingly on Facebook, not Yammer or Office365 site : link here). Last submission was 15/01/14 and final judging : 01/03/14.

check out this short video “Ivonne’s story” or how to show-off some BI in a few minutes and make someone’s day.

Ivonne's Story

Ivonne’s Story

By: Carlos De Leon

 

Project Server Start Date Reporting Quirk

July 11, 2013 1 comment

I came across a little possible pitfall while generating some reporting for a client, which I thought I should share with the community.

 

In Microsoft Project, the Start Date in Project Information defaults to the Start Date of the first task in the plan.

image

Obviously this can be changed in the Project Information so that the Start Date of the Project does not necessarily reflect the Start of the first task in the plan, or the Project Summary task.

image

So which date does appears in the reporting database? Well, here are the results:

From the MSP_EpmProject_UserView view in the reporting database

image

As you can see, the date from the MSP_EpmProject_UserView displays whatever is set in the Project Information. This might cause some unexpected information in reports, so we need to expand our query to include the date from the Project Summary task:

image

So, when writing the specifications for your reports, make sure you’re clear which date the client wants – it’s not unheard of having a plan created a few months in advance of the work being realistically scheduled which might cause this confusion!

Obviously the clear process-driven workaround is to have your Project Managers ensure that the Start Date in Project Information is updated when scheduling the project!

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