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Posts Tagged ‘Project Server’

Download example #MicrosoftFlow for Syncing #MSProject #Roadmap Row Item Status with #ProjectOnline Task Status #CDS #PowerPlatform #MSFlow #REST #SharePoint #WorkManagement #Office365

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Following on from a recent blog post where I demonstrated an example Microsoft Flow for syncing the Roadmap row item status with the associated Office 365 Project Online Task status, I have now made this solution starter Flow available as a package that can be downloaded and imported. For those of you that missed the previous blog post, a link can be found below here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/05/27/sync-msproject-roadmap-row-item-status-with-projectonline-task-status-using-microsoftflow-cds-powerplatform-msflow-rest-sharepoint-workmanagement-office365/

FlowImage

The Flow package can be downloaded from the Microsoft Gallery here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Flow-to-Sync-Roadmap-item-44174a4b

Once downloaded the Flow can be imported, here is a Microsoft Flow blog post on exporting and importing Flow packages: https://flow.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/import-export-bap-packages/

Once imported and the connections all set – this will require a Flow P1 or P2 license as it uses the CDS connector, ensure the account has the correct access to Project Online and the CDS, open the flow and update the trigger and actions as these will currently point to one of my demo tenants:

  1. Update the “When a project is published” trigger with your PWA URL
  2. Update the “GetTaskHealth” action the correct site address for your PWA URL
  3. Update the “GetTaskHealth” action Uri to use the correct task level field, replace “RoadmapHealth” as needed
  4. Update the Switch action to use the correct task custom field – the expression would be items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘FieldName’] – replace the field name with the correct task field
  5. Ensure the Case statements are updated to match the possible values in your custom field and map to the correct roadmap status value:
      • On Track = 0
      • Potential Problem = 1
      • At Risk = 2
      • Complete = 10
      • Not Set = 100
  6. Update the “List records” action to point to the correct environment
  7. Update the “Update a record” action to point to the correct environment

Now save the Flow and test it.

Hopefully you find this useful as a solution starter.

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Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

Create a #MicrosoftTeam for a #ProjectOnline Project using #MicrosoftFlow #Office365 #MicrosoftGraph #PPM #WorkManagement #PowerPlatform #AzureAD #Collaboration #Automation Part2

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Following on from my last blog post where I started to walkthrough a new Microsoft Flow I created for creating a Microsoft Team for a Project Online project, here is the final part of the Flow. For those that missed part 1, a link can be found below:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/06/12/create-a-microsoftteam-for-a-projectonline-project-using-microsoftflow-office365-microsoftgraph-ppm-workmanagement-powerplatform-azuread-collaboration-automation-part1/

In the last post we finished off where the Flow action had sent the request to the Graph API to create the new Team with the new channel and new web site tab and then discussed the 202 response and teamsAsyncOperation process. The next part of the Flow’s job is to get the new Teams webUrl and update the Team URL project level custom field in Project Online.

If the Status Code response is 202 to indicate its been accepted, the Flow them moves on to the next action which is a Parse JSON action to get the Location property from the headers output from the previous HTTP action response:

Parse JSON Action 

Then with the Location value another HTTP action is used to call the Graph API:

HTTPTeamResourceLocation

This performs an HTTP GET request to the Graph API to get the targetResourceLocation property from the newly created Microsoft Team, the Location property from the previous Parse JSON action is used in the URI. The advanced options are the same for all HTTP actions where the Graph API is used so I’ve not expanded this is this post – see part 1 for details.

The next action is another Parse JSON from the previous HTTPTeamResourceLocation HTTP action message body:

Parse JSON 2

This time the targetResourceLocation property is needed. Then the final Graph API call is performed to get the webUrl for the newly create Microsoft Team with another GET request. The targetResourceLocation property from the previous Parse JSON action is used in the URI:

HTTPTeamWebUrl

The Flow then moves on to the final Parse JSON action to parse the data returned in the HTTPTeamWebUrl message body:

Parse JSON 3

The Flow now has the new Microsoft Team web URL to update the Project Online project level custom field. The next Flow action is a Checkout project action:

Checkout Project

This action will checkout the project, the expression used here for the Project Id property is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’].

The next action is a SharePoint HTTP action to perform a REST call to POST to the Project Online CSOM REST API to update the custom field, this uses the same expression in the URI items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’] :

UpdateProjectTeamUrl

In the REST call data is sent in the body of the request. This contains the correct internal custom field name for the “Team URL” project field and the custom field value to update the field with, which is the webUrl from the previous Parse JSON 3 action. The internal custom field name would need to be updated to the correct field from your PWA instance.

The final action in this example Flow is Checkin and publish project:

Checkin and publish project

This action will publish the project after updating the custom field and check in the project, the expression used here for the Project Id property is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’].

Here are some projects that have been updated and have Microsoft Teams created:

Projects

Here is a Team for one of the test project – “1 Paul Mather Test Project 2”:

Team

This Team has the new Project channel and the Project Page web site tab that loads the Project Details Page from PWA:

Channel

That’s it, a simple low / no code solution to create Microsoft Teams for Office 365 Project Online projects! To use this in production it needs some additional work to handle various different scenarios but hopefully this is a good starting point for someone looking to do something similar.

I will look to provide a download link for this solution starter Flow in the next few days but will post the link on my blog.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

Create a #MicrosoftTeam for a #ProjectOnline Project using #MicrosoftFlow #Office365 #MicrosoftGraph #PPM #WorkManagement #PowerPlatform #AzureAD #Collaboration #Automation Part1

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Following on from my Microsoft Flow theme of blog posts lately, I am a big fan of the Power Platform in general, but I love Microsoft Flow for building low / no code solutions for Office 365 Project Online. In part 1 of this blog post I will start to walkthrough a new Microsoft Flow I have created that will create a new Microsoft Team for a Project Online project with a new channel and web site tab in the channel that displays the Project PDP directly in Teams. This makes use of 2 Project level enterprise custom fields in PWA, in this example I have one flag field called “Team Required?” and one text field called “Team URL”. The flag field is used to control / request a Microsoft Team for the project and the Team URL is used to store a web URL to the newly created Microsoft Team. This Flow has a few actions, these can be seen below:

image

Inside the for each loop:

image

Inside the condition check:

image

The connections used in this Flow are:

image

The account used has full admin access to the Project Online PWA instance.

This is a scheduled Flow, I have set this to run daily, but configure the frequency as required:

image

It’s probably best to schedule it out of hours so that hopefully the projects it creates Microsoft Teams for are checked in at the time the Flow runs as it will edit the Team URL custom field for that project.

Next we set some variables, these variable are used when using the HTTP action to call the Microsoft Graph API. You will need to create an Azure AD app in the Azure Portal and grant it Group.ReadWrite.All Application access:

image

When creating the Azure AD App you will need to make note of the Application (client) ID and the Directory (tenant) ID:

image 

You will also have to create a client secret for the app (keep this secure but make a note of the secret as you can’t view it after!):

image

These three strings / IDs are used in the three variables set in the Flow:

image

The next action is a REST call to the ProjectData API to get a the Project details for projects requesting a Microsoft Team but filtering out those that already have a Team created using this URL:

image

The full action details can be seen below:

image

The next  action is an Apply to each loop as the REST call could return more than one project the result array:

image

The input used is body(‘GetAllProjectsRequiringTeamCreation’)[‘value’], this is added as an expression.

The next action is another REST call but this time to the Project CSOM REST API – notice /ProjectServer rather than /ProjectData, this is the get the Project Owner’s user principal name as this is used later to set the Team / Office 365 group owner:

image

A variable is passed in to the URI to get the data for the current project, the expression used here is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’].

Then a Get user profile (V2) action is used, this is used to get the user ID:

image

The expression used here is body(‘GetProjectOwnerUPN’)[‘UserPrincipalName’]

The Flow now has all the data required to go and create the Microsoft Team, the next action is a standard Flow HTTP action:

image

image

In this action, an HTTP POST is used to post the JSON data defined in the body to the teams endpoint in the Microsoft Graph API to create the Team. Walking through the body of the request, firstly the the team template is set, in this example it is just the standard template, then the display name is set, here the items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectName’] expression is used. The team description is then set using same text and the same expression used in the display name. Then the owner is set using the Id property in the Dynamic content from the Get user profile (v2) action. That is the basic properties set to create this team. This example creates a public team, you could look to also set the visibility property to private if you wanted a private team, the default visibility is public. In this example, a new channel is also defined, the channel display name and description is set. Within that new channel a new website tab is also defined setting the tab name and contentUrl / websiteUrl. For the URLs, this creates a web site tab with a link to the Project schedule PDP as an example, the items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’] expression variable is used to dynamically pass in the correct project ID.

The next action is a condition action to check the response back from the Graph API:

image

This uses the Status Code output from the HTTP action, a 202 response indicates the API call was accepted, it doesn’t mean the process is completed as creating a team generates a teamsAsyncOperation to create the team. It is recommended to make a GET request to the Location found in the response header until that call is successful and returns the targetResourceLocation, retry every 30 seconds etc. This example Flow doesn’t perform the retry, it just attempts the call to the location and would fail if it is not completed. That would need to be handled in a production environment but in this test instance I’ve not had this fail yet (works on my machine Smile). I will offer this Flow solution starter as a download but before I do that, I will probably at least put a delay in before making the GET request to the location.

In the part 2 of the this blog post later this week, the rest of the Flow will be detailed.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

Sync #MSProject #Roadmap Row Item Status with #ProjectOnline Task Status using #MicrosoftFlow #CDS #PowerPlatform #MSFlow #REST #SharePoint #WorkManagement #Office365

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

At the recent Microsoft PPM Summit in Prague last week, Chris Boyd from the Microsoft Project Product team demonstrated syncing the Roadmap row item status with the task status from the Project Online schedule. This was done using compiled code in a console application which worked well. I set myself a little challenge to do something similar but all from Microsoft Flow. Being a public holiday here in the UK, I found an hour spare today to tackle this. In this blog post I walkthrough the Flow actions required to do this. A summary image can be seen below:

image

As you can see, this flow is triggered on a Project Online Project Publish. I then execute a REST query on the Project Data API using the send an HTTP request to SharePoint action:

image

I pass in the published project ID and select the TaskID and the custom field I’m using to set the Roadmap row item status. I created a custom field called “Roadmap Health” that was a lookup with the same status values as Roadmap but you can use any field and values, just update the query and Flow Switch action as needed.

I then create a new variable called “Health” and set the Type to an Integer:

image

I then add an Apply to each action and pass in the body(‘GetTaskHealth’)[‘value’] expression to use the output from my REST call:

image

I then have a condition check action to check for null values in the Roadmap Health field, the expression for the field is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘RoadmapHealth’] then null is also added via an expression:

image

You could remove the need for the condition check by filtering out the nulls in the REST call. If this is false, nothing happens as there is no status to sync, if this true the next action is a  Switch, the field I’m using in the switch is referenced using the expression: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘RoadmapHealth’]

image

Then for each possible value from the task level custom field you are using, map this to one of the Roadmap status’ by setting the Health variable, for example, when the Roadmap Health task field value is equal to “On Track” I set the variable to 0:

image

The Roadmap status enumerations are below:

  • On Track = 0
  • Potential Problem = 1
  • At Risk = 2
  • Complete = 10
  • Not Set = 100

Once that is completed for all possible outcomes, the next action is the List records Common Data Service action:

image

Here the Flow returns the Roadmap Item Link record for the TaskId passed in, the TaskId is referenced using the following expression: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘TaskId’]

The next action is another Apply to each action, Flow does this automatically as the List records would typically return more than one record:

image

The output used for this action is the default List records value from the Dynamic Content option. Then the final action within the Flow is the Common Data Service Update a record:

image

This action updates the Roadmap Items, I then pass in the List records Roadmap Item value from the Dynamic content panel, this is the Roadmap Item Id value. I also pass in the Health variable in the “Health Status Value” field. The flow will loop through all Project tasks and update the equivalent Roadmap row item status, pretty simple for a no / low code solution using only Microsoft Flow!

Over the next few days I will publish a short video for this Flow on my YouTube channel and also probably provide a download link for this Flow template to help as a solution starter.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#Microsoft #Planner Tasks in #ToDo #Office365 #WorkManagement #TaskManagement #PPM #Project

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

A quick blog post to highlight a new feature in Microsoft Planner and Microsoft To-Do, you can now sync your Planner tasks into Microsoft To-Do!

When you access Microsoft To-Do you will see a notification in the bottom left corner asking if you want to track tasks assigned to you in Planner as seen below:

image

Click Show list, this then adds the “Assigned to Me” list:

image

Ignore the test planner tasks I have assigned, this is from one of my example Flows for Project Online!

Clicking a task will load the task details pane on the right hand side:

image

From here I can mark the task as complete, update the Due Date, add notes or click the link to open the task directly in Planner. Marking as complete, updating the due date or adding notes from To-Do updates the task in Planner so you can manage your tasks all from To-Do without leaving!

Another awesome update from Microsoft!

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 2

April 30, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Following on from my last post on email notifications using Microsoft Flow, this post looks at further examples. Part 1 can be found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/18/projectonline-custom-email-notifications-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-msproject-exchange-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

In case you missed it, I also published a video last week with a simple example Flow to send the project owner an email on project creation: https://youtu.be/CCdxUqBrhEA

In part 2 we will look another example email notification to email each resource the projects they are assigned to for the coming week. The Flow can be seen below:

image

This is triggered on schedule as seen below, update as needed:

image

The Flow then gets some date time values using the Date Time actions for the current date time and a future date time:

image

The Flow then fires off an HTTP request to SharePoint to get a list of resources with email addresses from the Project Online Odata Reporting API:

image

Then using an Apply to each action we send an email to the assigned resources. Firstly we pass in the output from the previous step, which is:

body(‘GetAllResourcesWithEmailAddresses’)[‘value’]

image

Then inside the loop we perform another HTTP call to SharePoint, this time to get the resource’s assignments for the week by querying the Project Online Odata Reporting API as seen below:

image

Here we are passing in 3 variables to the Odata query:

  • ResourceId which is the following expression added in: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceId’]
  • Current time and Future time to filter the data returned from the time phased resource demand endpoint to this week, these are the outputs from the previous date time actions:

image

The Flow then creates an HTML table from the data returned from the previous action:

body(‘GetAllResourceAssignments’)[‘value’]

image

Then the final action in the Flow is to send an email:

image

The To value is an expression: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceEmailAddress’]

Update the email body as needed and include the output from Create HTML table action.

This will result in an email being sent to all resources in Project Online with email addresses containing their weekly assignments detailing the projects that they are working on, here is an example email:

image

Another example that demonstrates how easily custom email notifications can be created for Project Online using Microsoft Flow.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

Update: New #YouTube channel for all things related to #Microsoft #PPM #ProjectOnline #Office365 #Videos

April 23, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Just a quick post to highlight my new YouTube channel for all things related to Microsoft PPM including Project, Project Online, PowerApps, Flow etc. I will still be blogging here but I will also compliment some blog posts with short video clips where applicable. I will also post some videos that do not have accompanying blog posts such as my first video here:

https://youtu.be/CCdxUqBrhEA

This is a short video on a very simple Microsoft Flow that sends a quick email to the project owner when a new project is created in Project Online. I would like to hear your feedback and whether this is something that you would like to see more of / find useful.

If you do want to see more videos please subscribe to my channel below:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_b_pa1ADKlUqIpLK9AmR1g?sub_confirmation=1

Look out for more videos coming soon!

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:
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