Archive

Archive for the ‘Robin Kruithof’ Category

Practice makes Perfect Part 6 – Team planner

September 12, 2012 Leave a comment

plan-for-future-1 I rarely use team planner in my day to day activities what is a shame as it cool be valuable tool for anyone that regularly works with resources. In this post I will try to explain team planner and how you can use it. I will for instance show how resource leveling works and of course all the other options that are available.

Again I will be using Project Professional 2013 for this post. This is still in the preview version and it is not the final product. If you are curious about Project Professional 2013 you can go here and try it out for yourself.

 

Team planner what is it?

The new feature team planner was added in Project Professional 2010. This feature lets you plan your tasks for resources in a kind of roster. It is also great to spot over allocations and resolving these over allocations. As you can see in the image below you can see that Molly Dempsey is over allocated because she has to do two tasks at once.

image

Team planner here allows you to move your tasks to solve this over allocation. In this case above you have two options. 1. Reschedule your task or 2. Assign the task to someone else, and this is easy, you can just drag and drop the task.

Within team planner you have also the ability to use resource leveling. Resource leveling does exactly how it sounds. It will automatically solve (reschedule tasks) the over allocations you have your project. While this sounds cool I should also warn you that I might not always does what you want to do. Treat carefully when using this feature. As you can see in the image below I leveled the resource Molly Dempsey. imageMicrosoft Project will automatically solve the over allocation by placing one task behind the other. This solved the over allocation. However some tasks that have dependencies have been delayed. Like I said be carefully as this will not always do what you want it to do. This is mostly because of dependencies and constraints of a task you didn’t think about.

Always carefully inspect what Microsoft Project has done to your project. A good way to do this is set a baseline before you level. It is a great way to keep track of the changes made in your project. If you don’t know how to make a baseline and use it here is a early post I have made about baselines. Practice makes Perfect Part 2 – Baseline

image

You have four options when using resource leveling. Level resource will level the selected resource. Level All will level all of your resources in your project. Luckily you have the option to use Clear Leveling if you don’t like what leveling did to your project. Then you also have the ability to play around with the Leveling Options. I am not going to highlight these options here as they are pretty straight forward. Just look at them and play around with some settings.

There are some more things you can do with team planner like adding a note to a resource, great for reminding you what you did with a particular resources. You see check the information of the resource and you can even create a new resource in the team planner view.

The last thing I want to talk about is the details view. I recommend you turn this on all the time. This will give you all the information on the selected resource like what the resource is working ect. This information can be really useful when rescheduling tasks.

I hope this will give you a bit more insight in what you are able to do with the team planner feature and how you can use it when you want to handle over allocations in your project plan.

Up next in the Practice makes Perfect series – Groups and Filters.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/practice-makes-perfect-part-6-team-planner/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Project Online – The Timeline in Project Web Access

September 4, 2012 Leave a comment

2055.clip_image003_5D2260A7

With the Project Preview that started in July I had the time to test out Project Online. For people that do not know what Project Online is, it is basically Project Server 2013 in the cloud.

Previously made a post about the Project Professional Timeline and how you can use it. That post you can find here and this post is a little addition as Project Online has the Timeline in Project Web Access. I personally really like this addition to Project Web Access as it gives you a nice graphical presentation of your project. However there is a little more in Project Online.

Project Online is still in the preview version this is not the final product so changes can still be made.

So what is it?

Next to the normal functionality of the timeline what is now available in Project Web Access you have the added ability to add projects to the timeline. This enables you to make a graphical presentation of all your projects over time or just a subset of your projects whatever you prefer. So you are basically able to make your own Project Calendar pretty neat right?

So how does it work?

The timeline view in Project Web Access work the same as it does in Project Professional. Go to your project and select the task you want to add to the timeline.

image

Click add to timeline and you are done. From here you have the options to give them any color you want, make callout tasks and so on.

image

How can I do this for Projects?

When you are in project center you can select a project and in your projects menu you can select add project. If you want you can even add tasks to that view from a selected project.

image

When your done adding your projects to the timeline you can create something like this.

image

Pretty cool I would say. With just a few mouse clicks you can make a graphical presentation of your entire portfolio. If you click on a specific project in the timeline you can even open de project directly from the there.

Microsoft really tried to make Project Web Access as good as it can get. All these little features really make it easy for a project manager to do most of his work just from his browser.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/09/04/project-online-the-timeline-in-project-web-access/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

First Look session on the new release of Microsoft Project

August 31, 2012 1 comment

6864.Microsoft Logo.png-450x0 Next week on the 6th of September Ill be giving a Dutch presentation at Microsoft in the Netherlands about the new version of Microsoft Project. Ill be giving a overview on Microsoft Project Professional 2013 and Project Online. I will demonstrate all the new features that are available in the new version.

This session will give you a good overview of what’s new and coming your way and how to use the new version of Project in your business.

There are still places left for this free session so if you are interested you can sign up here. Please keep in mind this session is in the Netherlands and will be given in dutch.

First Look new release of Microsoft Project

Hope to see you there.

Microsoft Project Pro 2013 Preview Full Serial x86 x64

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/first-look-session-on-the-new-release-of-microsoft-project/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Practice makes Perfect Part 5 – Microsoft Project Resource Pool

August 21, 2012 3 comments

associates I was triggered to make this post about the Resource Pool functionality because I see a lot of questions about it popping up from clients and forums I am involved in.

In this post I will give a quick overview of how you create and use a resource pool.

Note that I am talking about Project Professional here and not the Project Server Enterprise resource pool functionality. I hope this post will give some insight in how you can use this functionality without having the luxury of Project Server.

Again I will be using Microsoft Project Professional 2013 to demonstrate this. However this is the preview version and not the final product changes may still occur.

What is a resource pool?

A resource pool is used to centralize the company resources in a Microsoft Project file. So in essence this Microsoft Project file will contain every employee that can be assigned to a project. The project file can then be saved to a file share so that everyone can access it or it can be saved locally if you only want to use it for yourself. When it is saved you can connect your project plans to the resource pool and gain access to the resources.

Note this file cannot reside on SharePoint. Project Professional won’t allow you to connect to the resource pool that is located on SharePoint.

So what can a resource pool mean for me?

With your project plans connected to the resource pool you can access and assign resource to your projects. When multiple projects share the same resource pool you will get a good view of the allocation of the company resources. This also allows you to see over-allocated resources where you have the ability to act on it.

So how do I create a resource pool?

The first thing you need to do is open Microsoft Project Professional and save the file to the location where you want your resource pool to reside. Give it a clear name that it is the resource pool. For this post I will call mine CXS Resource Pool.

When you created the file and saved it, you have to start filling it with your resources. Depending on how many resources you need to fill in this could take a while. A little trick to make it easy. If you happen to have a excel fill with employees names you can just copy it into the resource sheet.

Note: Make sure you have a name convention in place. Project doesn’t see the difference between R. Kruithof or Robin Kruithof. This could lead to duplicate resource in your resource pool and we don’t want that.

Ok now that we saved are resource pool and filled it with resources let’s see what it does, shall we.

image

Now that I have created my resource pool, how do I use it?

Before I tell you how to use it I have to tell you about the catch. To use the resource pool with your project it also need to be opened. This however can be in read-only mode as long as you have it open. Otherwise your project is not able to get the resource information out of the resource pool. Now that’s out of the way let’s continue.

Create your project and go to the resource tab. Click on Resource Pool and then Share Resources.

image

Select Use resources (requires at least one open resource pool) and select your resource pool file. Also make sure that Pool takes precedence and press OK.

image

Note: When you link a project to the resource pool Microsoft Project will recognize the project file as a resource pool. Whenever you open the resource pool you will get the following message.

image

My advice is if you don’t need to edit always open read-only. Additionally, once a project is linked to the resource pool it will ask you if it should open it. When clicking ok it will open the resource pool in read-only mode.

Now that you have linked the project to the resource pool we can start using it. As you can see in the image below I am able to select the resources residing in the resource pool.

image

For this post I made two projects: Project A and Project B. Both of these projects are linked to the resource pool. Let’s see what happens when I start assigning resource to my task. For good measure I will also create some over-allocation.

image

As you can see in the image above the project now has a over-allocation (The red man icon identifies over-allocations). This information is gathered from the resource pool.

Ok now to see where the over-allocation resides. You can either see this from the resource pool or from the project itself.

Let’s go to the Resource Usage sheet to see where the over allocation occurs.

Tip: In the Resource Usage view add the column “Project” and open the details view as well to get a clear indication which task of which projects are creating the over allocation.

image

As you can see in the image above the project gives you a clear indication on where the over- allocation resides. And because you know were the conflicts are you are able to act on it by using the team planner for example.

image

In the image above I have three options. One: delay the task of Project B. Two: delay the task of Project A or, Three: hand over the task to Alex running as he seems to have time. This example all depends on the priority of the projects and the ability of Alex Running to take over a task from Tim Mouse.

A resource pool gives you great insight on the resource utilization over multiple projects. Add this with the ability to make reports and you have a great way to see which resource is doing what and plan accordingly.

After playing around some more with over-allocations and reports I created the following report see image below. I love the new report functionality in Microsoft Project Professional 2013.

Note: When you want to create a report always do this in your project. The reason behind it is that while the resource pool has your resource information most reports are based on tasks even for resources. Because this information is located in the project plan you won’t be able to create a report with the information in the resource pool file itself.image

I hope this gives a bit more insight in how to create a resource pool and how you can use it. It is great functionality for organizations that does not have Project Server but still want to do centralized resource management. Using the resource pool will take some time to get used to and to use it effectively. But in the end it is worth it.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/21/practice-makes-perfect-part-5-microsoft-project-resource-pool/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Practice makes Perfect Part 4 – Indicators

August 16, 2012 Leave a comment

rag1 Not so long ago I was talking to a friend of mine who said that while he likes indicators in his project plan he just doesn’t have the time to figure out how to make them. So hé why not blog about it because he is probably not the only one that works with project on a day to day basis and want to get something more out of his plan.

To start of you need to know about the limitations. In standard Project Professional you are only able to make two types of indicators. One for Tasks and one for Resources. If you happen to work for a company that has Project Server you are also able to make indicators for Projects. This feature is mostly used to make nice dashboards.

In this post I am going to focus on what you can do in Project Professional without a connection to Project Server. Ill discuss and make a indicator for a Task.

Ill be using Project Professional 2013 for this exercise. Like always this is still the preview version so changes may still occurred. (My gut says that their won’t be but hé I still need to point it out.)

Let’s start shall we.

So how do I make a indicator?

When you started up Project Professional go to Project and select Custom Fields.

image

When you click on Custom Field you will be presented by the screen below.

image

In the top you can see which field you are making something for. Default setting is Task but you can also make one for resources. For this exercise I will be using the field Text1.

For the indicator I renamed the field Text1 to Progress. When you rename the field Text1 it will be displayed like this Text1 (Progress). In essence this will mean that for Project the field Text1 is still there but will display a different name.

As you can see I can do multiple things with this field like a lookup field or just a text field. But for now I am going to stick to making a Indicator. For this indicator I need formula and I am going to use this one:

IIf([Baseline Finish]=ProjDateValue(“NA”);”No Baseline”;IIf([Finish]<=[Baseline Finish]+5;”Green”;IIf([Finish]<=[Baseline Finish]+10;”Yellow”;”Red”)))

The above formula basically does the following: When no Baseline is set it will display “No Baseline”, if a baseline is set and the finish date of the task and the finish date of the baseline is on time with a slack of 5 days it will display the text green. If the task finish date is later then 5 days with a slack to 10 days it will display the text yellow. If it is later then 10 days it will display the text Red.

The reason behind this formula is that I don’t want to have a yellow or red smiley if I am one day late on my task. Because that is not a good representation of the project.

image

To make indicators I am going to map the text output to a Indicator. No Baseline equals a question mark. Green equals a green smiley. Yellow equals a Yellow smiley and Red equals a Red smiley.

The next thing you need to do is add the new field to your view. In Practice makes Perfect Part 3 – Views I showed how to do this.

However in this post I will just add the column to the default view. To add the field to the view you need to insert a new column. Be aware that you need to add the column Text1 instead of whatever name you gave to your field. When done it will look something like this.

image

As you can see I didn’t set a baseline yet for this project plan. Let’s change that shall we.

image

As you can see, after I changed my baseline and modified some days all indicator come out nicely.

This is just one indicator but depending on your needs you can make a few more. If you also seen Practice makes Perfect Part 3 – Views and know how to build a view you can actually make a dashboard with multiple indicators. This you could use to show management for example.

So it is easy to create indicators?

The hardest part of making a indicator is deciding what you want to see. After you decided what do see you have to make the formula. For more then one Project Manager this will be difficult. My advice is to ask around your own department or IT department that knows something about scripting or programming (it is really easy for them).

You can also look onto the internet their is a lot information about formula’s and how to create them.

I hope this post gives a little insight on how to create a indicators for your project. It can be really useful like said for a dashboard or to give a overall indications on your project.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/16/practice-makes-perfect-part-4-indicators/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

SharePoint List\Project Workspace list datasheet view edit problem.

August 13, 2012 Leave a comment

lijst This is a bit more technical post then you are used to. But I find it important to do some of these from time to time.

One of my clients had a problem about editing a list in the datasheet view in a Project Workspace. I also seen this issue coming up on the MSDN forums. A good opportunity for me to make a small post how to correct this.

In SharePoint 2010 or in this case the Project Server 2010 Project Workspace it is possible to edit a list in the datasheet view.

Now my client really wanted to edit the column “Comments” however this was for some reason not possible. The datasheet view didn’t let you edit the column and looked like it was only read-only. Here is what I did to fix this problem.

 

Go to the list you want to be able to edit in the datasheet view. Go to List Settings.

List settings

Go to the columns you want to change and edit it.

colums

As you can see in the picture below it has been set to enriched text.

Plaintext

The only thing you need to do is set it to Plain text.

Now go back to the list and go to the datasheet view. Now go to the column you want to edit. As you can see you are now able to enter text. Just a quick fix if you ever run into this problem.

This is it for me for now up to the next post Practice makes Perfect Part 4 – Indicators.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/13/sharepoint-listproject-workspace-list-datasheet-view-edit-problem/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Practice makes Perfect Part 3 – Views

August 9, 2012 Leave a comment

bromo_view_penanjakan This post in the Practice makes Perfect series is about views. The reason behind it is that I myself when starting to use Project for my Project plans always used the default view of Project to edit and view my Project Plan. I sometimes switched to the Tracking Gantt or resource sheet but that is about it.

Great view isn’t it!

Only when I became a Project Consultant and had to know a lot more of Project that I realized I was missing out on something really easy but with so many benefits.

For this post I am again using the Project Professional 2013 preview version. This is not the finally product so things might change.

Default view

While the default view of Project Professional gives you access to create a project plan quickly it lacks in certain areas when it comes to update your plan or being more specific to the data you need/want to see.

view 1

To change this you can do two things:

  • Add/remove new columns.
  • Or make a new view.

Why would I make a new view if I just can add/remove columns?

This is a good question. Add/removing a column might be easy but it can also create a lot of columns you don’t actually need all the time. Working with views gives you the ability to quickly switch between data you want to view. Instead of adding and removing columns every time.

So what kind of views can a make?

For instance like shown in this post you can make a view what make it easy for every Project Manager to update their plan with % Complete, Work, Remaining Work. Other example might be a view with your RAG (Red, Amber and Green) indicators (RAG indicators will be covered in a different post), Resource information displaying names, work and actual work. I could go on but it all depends on what you as Project Manager want to see. As shown in this post making a view depending on the depth will only take you between 5 > 30 minutes.

So how do I make a view?

The first thing you need to know that a view is built up from 3 components. Were two are optional (Filter and a Group) and one is not (Table).

We are going to start making this view by making a table. In Project Professional go to View > Tables and select More Tables in the dropdown menu.

table

Here you can choose to create a new table.

image

For the purpose of this post I am going to create a view that makes it easy to update the status of a project.

In the image below I made a table with fields like % Complete, Remaining Work, Work and Start and Finish as an example.

image

You properly will be playing around with the alignment of the data and the width of the columns but when you are done you can press ok and you are done.

Now the next thing we can do is define a filter or group this is optional and this post I am not going to make use of them (Filters and groups will be discussed in a new post).

Now that I have my table I want to start using it in my own view. In Project Professional go to View > Other Views highlighted in the picture below.

image

Select New to create your view.

image

Give your new view a name and a screen you want to use. There are a lot of options here and I would go through them all to see what you find useful. If I only want to see data a good screen to take is the Task Sheet. This will leave out the Gantt Chart and basically only show you the columns.

To make a view you are required to always choose a filter or a group. If you do not want a filter or a group you will need to select No Group for the Group and All Tasks for the filter. These are the default options if you don’t want a group or filter interfering with your view. When done you can see your new view in the views bar. The images below are the results.

imageimage

This view is created in about 5 – 10 minutes. Some more complicated views might take longer but this gives you a fast way to make a view, to view the data you want. In this instance updating % Complete and Remaining Work.

As always you have to experiment with making views but I can promise you that it is definitely worth it. This creates standardization on how you view your data in your project plan. Views themselves can even be used as a report for your management. The great thing about views is that once you make them you can use them for every project.

Making views makes your life as a Project Manager much much much easier. Don’t take my word for it start playing around with it yourself.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/09/practice-makes-perfect-part-3-views/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Practice makes Perfect Part 2 – Baselines

August 6, 2012 Leave a comment

image When I was in a Prince2 Practitioner refresh course the other week I asked around who uses Project Professional to plan their projects. Only a few did, then I asked who uses baselines in their plans. None of them responded. This gave me the incentive to make a post about baseline usage in Project Professional.

For this post I will again use Project Professional 2013. As always this is not the finished product and images do not represent the final version. Things might change.

What is a baseline?

A baseline within project is basically a snapshot of your plan. Almost like taking a photo. This is very handy as every Project Manager knows a project plan is subject to a lot of changes. Using baselines give you a good opportunity to track what has changed in your plan.

The first thing you need to determine is “when am I making my first baseline”. In large organizations this is mostly handled by a PMO (Project Management Office) or by the Project Manager. In small organizations the Project Manager is generally responsible for setting the first baseline. If we take PRINCE2 for example your first baseline could be set at the end of the process Initiating a Project.

It is also relevant to know that Project Professional gives you 11 baselines per project. Baseline (0) to Baseline 10. When you have determined when your first baseline has to be set you have to decide which baseline to set. I recommend to always use Baseline 10. The reason behind this is that baseline (0) is easier to override by accident than baseline 10 is.

Where can I set the baseline for a project?

In Project Professional you can set the baseline under Project > Set Baseline Schedule.

image

As you can see in the image below you got a few options. You can select which baseline to set, Set interim plan. Set a baseline for Entire Project or Selected tasks. For this exercise I will set my first baseline for the Entire Project.

image

When you go back to the same screen you can see on which date you last saved your baseline.  So what can you do with that? You can make it visible in your project plan. Go to Format > Baseline and select the baseline you have set. In my case this is Baseline 10. A other option is to set your Gantt view to Tracking Gantt.

image

When you selected this option or a tracking Gantt a bar is added in your Gantt Chart which represents the baseline. In the image below it is the grey bar.

image

During a project you are able to make multiple baselines to track where you are delayed or even ahead of schedule and why. I recommend you make a new baseline when you start the next phase of your project. By doing so you can so by the end of the Project where delays have occurred. These delays can then be added to your lessons learned report.

After making baseline 10 I made some modifications to the plan by increasing duration of some tasks. I also added the baseline10 Duration column to my  screen to show you what I actually had planned and where the delays have occurred.

As you can see by the grey bars in my chart my project has a significant delay. This also gives you a good overview where the delays occurred. Pretty useful when reporting to the Project Board.

image

Reporting of baseline data within Project Professional 2013

In the image below I made a report displaying the scheduled duration vs. duration of baseline 9 and 10. This report is made by the new functionality of Project Professional 2013. (Yeah I know this is really cool!)

image

Being able to see where your project plan is delayed or ahead of schedule can help any Project Manager. In the case of a delay he/she can take corrective measures. For example the Project Manager could request an extra resource for a specific task to make it finish earlier and by doing so getting back on track.

The usage of baselines in a Microsoft Project plan is one of the most useful tools you can have during a project. It can really help you out. As always experiment with baselines in Project and see for yourself. I hope this gave a little insight in the use of baselines.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/08/06/practice-makes-perfect-part-2-baselines/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Project Professional 2013 Reports

report With the preview version out I was able to play around with Project Professional 2013. Like always this is the preview version so things might change.

When playing around with Project Professional 2013 I came by a new feature that I just had to blog about. Reports in Project Professional were not always of best use. They had their uses but in my experience I hardly used them.

In Project Professional 2013 however Microsoft decided to do something cool.

They basically made a report dashboard. There are a few pre-defined reports to choose from:

  • Project Overview
  • Work Overview
  • Burndown
  • Cost Overview

And much more…

One option in particular is very cool. Creating your own report by the use of a pivot table mechanism. This makes it very easy to create a report in a few clicks. Add that with all the different options available to you, you have the ability to create  a really useful reports in mere minutes.

image

This for me personally is a major improvement on Project Professional 2010. It enhances the ability of Project Managers to get good and valuable reports. In this dashboard you can do some cool actions. Like for instance, adding your company logo to your report.

image

This report capability also gives you the ability to rearrange all the fields. This is very handy for any Project Manager. How many times have you been fiddling with a report to fit everything on one page. This time is has been made really easy.

image

Next to that you have the option to add charts, table and textboxes and much more…

Next to that you have the option to add charts, table and textboxes and much more…

All in all too much to sum up in a small blog post. I would say experiment with it. In my opinion this greatly increases the usability of Project Professional 2013 for any Project Manager. A really good use for these reports would be a Checkpoint Report or Highlight Report.

I am really impressed by this feature, and what it can do, and what it means for anyone that needs to report on a project. The easy to use prebuilt reports already cover the most of report a Project Manager needs.

I am off to see what else Project Professional 2013 has in store for me. But for now consider me impressed.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/07/30/project-professional-2013-reports/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:

Project Online a new step forward

Just as always Project Online and Project Professional 2013 are out in the preview version. A lot of changes can still be made. I also want to point out that statements I make are mostly based on assumptions. As I don’t know what the final product will actually bring.

With the preview version coming out Microsoft also showed Project Online. So what is it? It is basically the office 365 version of Project Server. Project Server at the moment is only available as a Server product. For small – medium companies this might be too expensive to support.

With the coming of Project Online small-mid sized companies have the ability to benefit from almost all the capabilities of Project Server (Depending on the prize of course). Because it is based on office365 it a lot easier for small to mid sized companies to get there hands on it.

image

Project Online Home Page

This will open doors for these companies to start thinking about Enterprise Project Management (EPM). Meaning enterprise resource management, portfolio management en centralized project store for all the projects within the company.

Why would I still buy Project Server if Project Online is available? For me as it looks now in the preview version, Project Online can be categorized as a Project Server starter kit. It has a fare share of the functionalities and features of Project Server but has in its office365 environment somewhat limited configuration and development capabilities. Meaning branding, custom solutions, custom reports and probably more.

For bigger companies this might be a reason to go for a Project Server deployment instead of Project Online.

However I do think Project Online will be a great way for small to mid sized companies to experience Project. It is a great way for these companies to start managing Projects, Resources and Portfolios in a entirely different way.

If you want to test out Project Online you can do that here: http://www.microsoft.com/project/en-us/preview/default.aspx

I think Microsoft made a great leap forward with Project. I can’t wait to help new clients to set this up. Because don’t be fooled even Project Online needs a little bit of configuration before you can start using it for your company. Always remember the tool is easy, the process in your company around EPM is not.

via SpeakingSilent » Robin Kruithof http://speakingsilent.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/project-online-a-new-step-forward/

Robin Kruithof
I am Robin Kruithof. I am working at CXS in the Netherlands as a Microsoft Project Consultant. My passion lies in Project Management and everything in the Project Management domain.

This article has been cross posted from speakingsilent.wordpress.com/ (original article)

Categories: Robin Kruithof, Work Tags:
%d bloggers like this: