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#Microsoft #Planner Tasks in #ToDo #Office365 #WorkManagement #TaskManagement #PPM #Project

Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

A quick blog post to highlight a new feature in Microsoft Planner and Microsoft To-Do, you can now sync your Planner tasks into Microsoft To-Do!

When you access Microsoft To-Do you will see a notification in the bottom left corner asking if you want to track tasks assigned to you in Planner as seen below:

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Click Show list, this then adds the “Assigned to Me” list:

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Ignore the test planner tasks I have assigned, this is from one of my example Flows for Project Online!

Clicking a task will load the task details pane on the right hand side:

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From here I can mark the task as complete, update the Due Date, add notes or click the link to open the task directly in Planner. Marking as complete, updating the due date or adding notes from To-Do updates the task in Planner so you can manage your tasks all from To-Do without leaving!

Another awesome update from Microsoft!

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Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 2

April 30, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Following on from my last post on email notifications using Microsoft Flow, this post looks at further examples. Part 1 can be found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/18/projectonline-custom-email-notifications-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-msproject-exchange-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

In case you missed it, I also published a video last week with a simple example Flow to send the project owner an email on project creation: https://youtu.be/CCdxUqBrhEA

In part 2 we will look another example email notification to email each resource the projects they are assigned to for the coming week. The Flow can be seen below:

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This is triggered on schedule as seen below, update as needed:

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The Flow then gets some date time values using the Date Time actions for the current date time and a future date time:

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The Flow then fires off an HTTP request to SharePoint to get a list of resources with email addresses from the Project Online Odata Reporting API:

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Then using an Apply to each action we send an email to the assigned resources. Firstly we pass in the output from the previous step, which is:

body(‘GetAllResourcesWithEmailAddresses’)[‘value’]

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Then inside the loop we perform another HTTP call to SharePoint, this time to get the resource’s assignments for the week by querying the Project Online Odata Reporting API as seen below:

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Here we are passing in 3 variables to the Odata query:

  • ResourceId which is the following expression added in: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceId’]
  • Current time and Future time to filter the data returned from the time phased resource demand endpoint to this week, these are the outputs from the previous date time actions:

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The Flow then creates an HTML table from the data returned from the previous action:

body(‘GetAllResourceAssignments’)[‘value’]

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Then the final action in the Flow is to send an email:

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The To value is an expression: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceEmailAddress’]

Update the email body as needed and include the output from Create HTML table action.

This will result in an email being sent to all resources in Project Online with email addresses containing their weekly assignments detailing the projects that they are working on, here is an example email:

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Another example that demonstrates how easily custom email notifications can be created for Project Online using Microsoft Flow.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

Try not to kill a SharePoint deployment before it starts

April 30, 2019 Leave a comment

I also thought of another title for this blog post like “Trying to build the roof before the wall?”.

Not sure what I am referring to? Keep reading.

SharePoint is huge and SharePoint Online is a even bigger beast! Agreed?

Over the past few weeks I have been training users in an international organisation, they have just released their Office 365 tenant to the whole organisation and realised that they need to show the users how to actually use it ;-).

This is not even the point of this post, as this happens quite often at the moment, unfortunately we are quite used that customers get a professional in when it’s nearly too late.

During the training preparation, I have been told that users do “not have the time to get trained”, but that “they have lots of appetite for advanced features”. Not knowing quite sure what this meant but confident that the content may be customised, we agreed on several condensed overview of 1.5 hour per group.

The reality was just as expected: 95% of the training attendees never opened the Office 365. So I adapted the training during the short training, being more like a coach on what they can do with SharePoint and the tools in Office 365.

Here is my shout-out and the reason behind this blog’s title:

Having spent enough time with the business users of the various departments, it turned out that all of them would have been very keen to work on a content strategy, data migration plan, departmental site layout if IT had approached them.

Instead, they are now seeing SharePoint as yet another tool that is being imposed at them. A lot of them are not so keen on this idea, and already thinking to not use it since they still have access to the to-be-retired-one-day other cloud storage.

Basically, a big failure of internal communication.

So please! please! Get your users on-board before you even release anything. SharePoint Adoption is a major key to success.

Some ideas:

  • Before deployment:
    • Get your CEO on board and make him/her announce the upcoming platform
    • Invite employees to”15 min drop-in session” (with food provided) to demo 2 or 3 key features, and stay for 30 min Q&A
    • Speak to your comms department.. a lot! IT and Comms need to be best friends as one provides the structure, the other will provide the content.
    • Interview and get a genuine interest in how the other teams work, like HR and Ops … It will be easier to offer them solutions that they didn’t think about later.
    • Let users know that their data will have to be migrated and organise workshops to show them how the migration will work and when you will need their input. This will make the user valued and responsible and it will pay back in the long term.
    • Organise a competition for finding the intranet name.

Or again and obviously, call the professional SharePoint guy early in your deployment project. (hang on… when there is such project plan!;-)

via François on SharePoint, Office 365 and more technologies http://bit.ly/2J44vI1

François Souyri
French native Sharepoint Consultant living in London. A crossway between a designer, developer and system architect. Prefers stretching the limit of out-of-the-box features rather than breaking them into code. When not working with Microsoft Sharepoint François is often found on Web2.0 News sites and related social networking tools.

This article has been cross posted from sharepointfrancois.com (original article)

Categories: Work Tags: ,

Update: New #YouTube channel for all things related to #Microsoft #PPM #ProjectOnline #Office365 #Videos

April 23, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

Just a quick post to highlight my new YouTube channel for all things related to Microsoft PPM including Project, Project Online, PowerApps, Flow etc. I will still be blogging here but I will also compliment some blog posts with short video clips where applicable. I will also post some videos that do not have accompanying blog posts such as my first video here:

https://youtu.be/CCdxUqBrhEA

This is a short video on a very simple Microsoft Flow that sends a quick email to the project owner when a new project is created in Project Online. I would like to hear your feedback and whether this is something that you would like to see more of / find useful.

If you do want to see more videos please subscribe to my channel below:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_b_pa1ADKlUqIpLK9AmR1g?sub_confirmation=1

Look out for more videos coming soon!

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 1

March 18, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

This blogs post has been delayed due to all of my blog posts on Microsoft’s new Roadmap service – summary post here with most of the posts: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/01/project-roadmap-cds-app-overview-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatfom-dynamics365/

This post continues the series of posts I started to do in December 2018 following on from a Microsoft Tech Sync session where I presented a session on Project Online and Flow better together. As it’s been a while, here are links to the previous posts:

Post 1: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

Post 2: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-2/

Post 3: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/14/projectonline-snapshot-data-to-sharepoint-list-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform/

In this post we take a look at an option for building custom email notifications with a no code / low code solutions using Microsoft Flow. This example sends an email for projects that are running late. There are two simple versions for this, one with a details table in the email and one with just the project name but includes hyperlinks in the email to the project detail page. These are both very similar, the first one can be seen below:

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This is triggered on the Recurrence trigger, set based on your requirement. This then uses the Sent an HTTP request to SharePoint action to query the Project Online OData Reporting API:

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This will control the data that is included in the email, so this OData query can be updated based on your requirements. Next the Flow uses the Create an HTML table action:

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For this action we pass in the project data array from the previous action using a custom expression:

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The final action is to send the email:

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In the body of the email here we are just using the output from the previous Create HTML table action:

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This results in an email being sent with the data from the OData query used (these are just my test projects and not real projects!):

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Very simple! Sticking with the same theme for late projects but this time the email contains hyperlinks into the projects, this Flow is slightly different:

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The difference here is we do not use the Create HTML table action but instead use Select and Join from the Data Operations actions. Firstly the select actions looks like this:

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The Select action is used to transform the data in the results array from the previous step. Just the same as the Create HTML table in the first example, we pass in the project data array value from the previous action into the From property. Then the Select action was changed to use the text mode using the toggle option outlined in red below:

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In Map properties, transform the data as needed in the email such as:

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Here we are building up a URL passing in the ProjectId for the PDP URL and the ProjectName for the URL title. Then we use the Join Data Operations action to put each project on a new row in the email:

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The From property is just using the Output from the previous Select action:

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Then the final action is the email:

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Note the Is HTML property is set to Yes. In the Body we type the email body as required plus the Output from the previous Join action:

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Then the email is sent on the defined schedule with clickable links to the Project Detail Pages (again, these are just my test projects and not real live projects!):

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These are two simple examples but as you can see, it’s very easy to build Project Online related emails using Microsoft Flow. I have some more examples in my next posts coming soon.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#Project Roadmap #PowerBI report pack with #AzureBoards data #PPM #ProjectManagement #MSProject #Office365 #PowerPlatform #Dynamics365 #CDS #Odata #AzureDevOps

March 16, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

This post follows on from my last post where I posted about using Azure DevOps Azure Boards in Project Roadmap, in case that you missed it here is the link: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/15/project-roadmap-azuredevops-azureboards-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatform-cds/

In this post we will cover combining Azure Board data into the Roadmap Power BI report pack I released. Here is the blog on the default Roadmap Report pack if you haven’t seen that yet: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/01/30/project-roadmap-powerbi-report-pack-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatform-dynamics365/

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I covered a similar topic the other week but for combining Project Online data here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/08/project-roadmap-powerbi-report-pack-with-projectonline-data-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-office365-powerplatform-dynamics365-cds-odata/

With the Power BI Roadmap report set up and loading data from your Roadmap service which includes linked items from Azure Boards, we will now edit that Power BI report to bring in Azure Boards data. Firstly click Get Data > Odata Feed and enter the Azure DevOpps OData API URL like below:

https://analytics.dev.azure.com/organizationName/_odata/v1.0/

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For details on the Azure DevOps OData API in Power BI, see this article: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/devops/report/powerbi/access-analytics-power-bi?view=azure-devops

Click OK and sign in as required. In the Navigator window select Projects and WorkItems plus other tables as required:

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Click Edit to load the Power Query editor. Edit the queries as needed, such as removing columns, remaining columns etc. but ensure you leave the ProjectId and WorkItemId columns in Projects and WorkItems queries as these are required to join the Azure Boards data with the Roadmap data. Once finished you should have at least 9 queries like below:

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Click Close and Apply in the Power Query editor. Set up the relationships between the Projects table and RoadmapRowLinks and WorkItems table and RoadmapItemLinks:

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Now update the Roadmap Detail page in the report as needed, as seen below outlined in red, I have included some project and work item level data from my linked Azure Boards Projects and Work Items:

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It’s that simple!

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:

#Project Roadmap #AzureDevOps #AzureBoards #PPM #ProjectManagement #MSProject #ProjectOnline #Office365 #PowerPlatform #CDS

March 15, 2019 Leave a comment
Paul Mather
I am a Project Server and SharePoint consultant but my main focus currently is around Project Server.
I have been working with Project Server for nearly five years since 2007 for a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner in the UK, I have also been awared with the Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011.
I am also a certified Prince2 Practitioner.

This article has been cross posted from pwmather.wordpress.com (original article)

All of my previous posts on the new Roadmap service for Project has been based on Project Online projects, In this post we take a quick look at using Azure DevOps projects in Roadmap. This post wont go into much detail about the new Roadmap service, only how to use Azure DevOps projects in Roadmap. For details on the Roadmap service see this summary post: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/01/project-roadmap-cds-app-overview-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatfom-dynamics365/

Firstly ensure you have access to a project in Azure DevOps. This project will need work items (Epics, User Stories, Features, Tasks etc.) that have two fields used that might not be standard in your organisation depending on the process used in the project, these are Start Date and Target Date. To do this, for each type of work items that you want to sync in Roadmap, from the Work Items board in the Azure DevOps project, click “New Work Item” then the item such as Epic:

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This list of work items might vary depending on which process your project uses, this example project just uses the basic process. When the Epic page loads, click Customize from the Actions menu seen below:

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Click New Field:

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Then set the option to “Use an existing field” and select “Start Date” and click Add Field:

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Repeat this to add “Target Date” then update the layout to move the two new fields where you want them:

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Repeat this process for other work items as needed such as Tasks, User Stories or Features depending on what board process your project uses. For example, if your project uses the default Agile process you will just need to update the User Story work item to add these fields. Now with some example Epic work items created in my test Azure DevOps project, each with a start date and target date, I can move over the Roadmap.

I’ve added a new row to my Roadmap for the Azure DevOps project, on the “Connect to a project” menu, I will select “Azure Boards”:

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Ensure the Azure DevOps organization URL is correct and validated, then select your project:

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Then the Flow connection details will appear:

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Sign in if prompted. Then click Connect:

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Then search for items to add:

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Then click Add. Now the items will be added to the row:

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This data will be kept in sync using Microsoft Flow just like the Project Online projects. The Project Online projects Flow runs every 5 minutes by default where as the Azure Board project Flow runs every hour.

In the next post we will look to combine the Azure DevOps Project Board data with the Roadmap data in Power BI.

Categories: Paul Mather, Work Tags:
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